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Saturday, August 10, 2013

Summer Assignment #5-A Model of Christian Charity Excerpt-John Winthrop, 1630



The Winthrop Fleet was a group of eleven sailing ships under the leadership of John Winthrop that carried approximately 700 Puritansplus livestock and provisions from England to New England over the summer of 1630. The Puritan population in England had been growing for many years leading up to this time. They disagreed with the practices of the Church of England, whose rituals they viewed as superstitions and attempted over many years to modify religious practice in England to conform to their views. King James wished to suppress this growing rebellious movement. Nevertheless, the Puritans eventually gained a majority in Parliament. James' son King Charles came into the greatest possible conflict with the Parliament, and viewed them as a threat to his authority, temporarily dissolving parliament in 1626, and again the next year, and finally dissolving parliament permanently in March 1629. Motivated by these political events, a wealthy group of leaders obtained a Royal Charter in March 1629 for a colony at Massachusetts Bay.
 The initial migration took three phases.  A fleet of five ships had departed a month previously for New England that included approximately 300 colonists, led by Francis Higginson.  Later that year, the remaining investors elected John Winthrop as governor, who then led a fleet of 5 ships, followed by 6 more several weeks later, totaling nearly 700.  Additionally, an existing settlement, Salem, was established in 1626.  Winthrop's colony and authority extended control over Salem, previously run by John Davenport.
The Great Migration of Puritans to New England continued for nearly a decade. They came in family groups, rather than as isolated individuals, and were motivated chiefly by a quest for freedom to practice their Puritan religion.
 Meanwhile, other Puritans and members of Parliament, namely Oliver Cromwell, fought a series of civil wars from 1642-1651. They deposed, tried, and eventually executing Charles I.* The English Civil War led to the establishment of a Commonwealth government that lasted until 1660, and the Puritan-dominated Parliament actually banning Christmas celebrations.
The above information was modified from various Wikipedia entries. 
 
The execution of Charles I


John Winthrop's Model of Christian Charity - delivered on board the Arbella as members of the Massachusetts Bay Colony sailed toward the New World - describes the struggle of Puritans and their "errand into the wilderness." Their struggle? How can a group of outcasts who have a habit of quarreling with authority construct a strong society without fighting amongst themselves?

As you know from your reading of Chapter 3, John Winthrop (1588-1649) was governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony - a group that left England in search of trade opportunities in the New World. Like most members of the Colony, Winthrop was a Puritan. This group claimed that the Church of England was corrupted by selfish leaders and petty squabbles. In contrast, Puritans envisioned an idealized community in which all citizens would focus their lives on the word of God. Ironically, the Puritans' almost single-minded pursuit of a perfected society based on biblical teachings resulted in impressive success in secular affairs. This success is often explained by the so-called "Puritan Work Ethic" - the ability to sacrifice personal ambitions for larger goals. Puritans also believed that they could be a blessed people - chosen by God to set an example for others.

Both of these aspects have Puritan New England, and Winthrop's sermon have infused themselves into the American Identity. What it means to be an American, for generations, has involved hard work (especially on the East Coast [though, since the 18th century, this has constantly been diminished by increased technology]). Furthermore, the idea that the Puritan community that settled Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 was to be an example for others to follow has truly been one of the things that America has stood for since that time, and increasingly so since the American Revolution. To this day, the United States of America constantly redefines how it will be an example to others, whether through its own actions, or acting on the behalf of other peoples and nations. Some might not like it, but it is truly, what the identity of the United States of America has become: hence, American Identity.
The Assignment
A. Read the excerpt from John Winthrop's A Model of Christian Charity, in regards to being a "City upon a hill."  

B. Following the commenting guidelines, answer ANY of the following questions (choose 2 or 3), and respond to them in the comments section of this post.


  1. To what extent did John Winthrop’s “A Model of Christian Charity” provide a powerful and workable founding vision for his colony? For what would become the United States of America?
  2. What does John Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” sermon explain about the beliefs and goals of the Puritans?
  3. One way to read the lay sermon A Model of Christian Charity is as a kind of a “peptalk” or “motivational speech.” What points does Winthrop seem to want to make his audience feel good or motivated about?
  4. The most lasting, final image from A Model of Christian Charity is that of the “city on a hill."  Think carefully about this image. What sorts of things does it suggest to you, literally—that is, what is important about a literal city on a literal hill? Then, think about why Winthrop is turning to that image in this particular context—what does he want to suggest about his Puritan community and their sense of mission? 
  5. The phrase “city on a hill” is still used by politicians today in speaking about America. Why? What does this image still suggest about America’s conception of itself?
C. Return in a few days and read through the responses of others.  Again, following the commenting guidelines, provide feedback, criticism, or ask questions.  Also, if somebody responds to your comment, feel free to comment back, of course, being polite.  It will help promote positive dialogue in class later this year.

Both B & C must be completed to earn full credit for the assignment.

*The execution of Charles I is of particular interest to those of us living around New Haven.  The charges against the king were repeated against George III at the start of the Revolution.  Meanwhile, after the restoration of Charles II, he attempted to eliminate those involved in the trial and execution of his father. Three judges, John DixwellEdward Whalley, and William Goffe fled to New Haven, Connecticut. Whalley and Goffe hid in what is known as Judges Cave in West Rock Ridge State Park, in New Haven.  For those that are interested in this, and its significance in American history, and America's republic, there is a fascinating article from HistoryToday. There's also a docu-drama on the Trial, Judges, and their own executions.  I'd personally read the article.  It's better.  But still, here you go.


50 comments:

Ashley Maloney said...

The points Winthrop seems to want to make his audience feel good or motivated about is to put loyalty, honesty, friendship, and brotherhood above all else. Winthrop says, "For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us." What he is saying is that later people will look up to them for what they had accomplished, like you would look up to a city that is on a hill. Winthrop is also saying that everyone is the same, weather rich or poor, it doesn't matter, treat everyone the way you would want to be treated.

The image of the "city on a hill" suggests that they are being looked up to, in a positive way. In the title it says "A Model" and that's what this city is, a model for what could evolve into something bigger. The actions, rules, and beliefs could be put into religions or large communities. Winthrop put this image in the text because it gets the readers to think that maybe our every day lives were influenced by a city on a hill, and that great accomplishments like this don't go away, they get passed down through time and can show up in your own life without you even thinking that it did. His Puritan community and their sense of mission thought about what they could do the better themselves and even impact the future.

C said...

Does the United States of America still aim to be a city on a hill?

Jillian Murphy said...

John Winthrop's "A model of Christian Charity" explains about the beliefs and goals of Puritans. In the passage it says, "to do justly, to love mercy, to walk humbly with our God." This shows that their goals and beliefs were to please God and God alone. They believed that if they were to do as he wanted, "The Lord will be our God and delight in all our ways, so that we shall see much more of His wisdom, power, goodness…". Therefore, while creating their government, they would take their religious beliefs into account. This could potentially cause problems regarding opposing beliefs.

The phrase "a city on a hill" suggests to me that the Puritans believed they were model citizens, and their city should be a model as well. A city on a hill can be seen by everyone around it, so it would be important to set an example that was nothing less than perfect. John Winthrop thought ,"So that if we shall deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken and so cause Him to withdraw His present help from us." This is his way of expressing his fear that if their religion does not serve the people well, he believes God will become angry and people will not want to convert. It would be more effective to have a "perfect" to have others convert to Christianity.

Jillian Murphy said...

Hi Ashley,
I like how you wrote "great accomplishments like this don't go away". The Puritans hoped to be the model city and have great accomplishments, but I also think that they wanted to prove that their religion is the best choice. After all, a city on a hill is where everyone can see it, and its "perfection".

Cassandra R. said...

John Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” sermon explains the beliefs and goals of the Puritans. A belief of the Puritans is that they should all work together peacefully otherwise nothing good will come out of the new colony. He states, “We must be knit together in this work as one man… all meekness, gentleness, patience, and liberality… make others’ conditions our own, rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together…” They all need to go through everything together; after all they are in the same situation and are all struggling. Winthrop also believes that they should follow God’s rules and be peaceful so that the Puritans could get along so that they can have successful lives in the colony. He says, “We are commanded this day to love the Lord our God, and to love one another, to walk in His ways and to keep His commandments and His ordinance, and His laws, and the articles of our covenant with Him that we may live and be multiplied, and that the Lord our God my bless us in the land whither we go to possess it.” One of Winthrop’s goals is for God to approve of the covenant of their new colony and for Him to help them along the way. They had “besought Him of favor and blessing. Now if the Lord shall please to hear us, and bring us in peace to the place we desire, then hath He ratified this covenant and sealed our commission, [and] will expect a strict performance of the articles contained in it.” Another goal of the Puritans is for the colonists to see God’s full effect of what He can truly do for them. He wants to see “much more of His wisdom, power, goodness, and truth than formerly we have been acquainted with. We shall find that the God of Israel is among us, when ten of us shall be able to resist a thousand of our enemies…” Therefore the Puritans beliefs and goals are all centered on pleasing God so that God can help them in the long run.

There are points Winthrop seems to want to make his audience feel good or motivated about. One point he makes to make the audience feel good is that everyone is equally honest or wealthy. He says, “From hence it appears plainly that no man is made more honorable than another, or more wealth, etc.” He wants them not to compare themselves because they are fine just the way they are. Another point he makes to try and make people feel good about is how everyone is going to look up to their society if everything goes as planned. They will be the role models, and everyone wants to be the one that every always looks up to. He says, “We shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us.” He wants the audience to feel good by making the point that they will be able to stand up to the enemies. He wants them to feel confident that by taking these steps to please God, they will get results and be able to compete. He states, “Ten of us shall be able to resist a thousand of our enemies.” He tries motivating them by giving a negative effect. If they decide not to be peaceful, and if they start being violent and ignore God, then bad things will happen that will ruin their lives. He states, “The Lord will surely break out in wrath against us, be revenged of such a perjured people, and makes us know the price of the break of such a covenant.” It will trash their names and no one will look up to them anymore. Even God won’t be happy with what they are doing. He motivates them by scaring them. This will then make them act positively.

Cassandra R. said...

Dear Jill,
I really like the idea that you suggest about God and how he will stop helping them when you say, "This is his way of expressing his fear that if their religion does not serve the people well, he believes God will become angry and people will not want to convert. It would be more effective to have a "perfect" to have others convert to Christianity." It brings a new perspective about him, and how he's possibly using God to have a perfect society. Maybe he wanted people to remember him for having the "city upon a hill," and that including God in the situation would make things better. What is your opinion?
Sincerely,
Cassie

Anastasija Cupic said...

2. John Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” sermon explained that the Puritans believed they were chosen by God to help the Christian community by being a model city. They claimed to be “entered into covenant with Him for this work” in which the Puritans will “...love one another, to walk in his ways and to keep His commandments and His ordinance, and His laws, and the articles of our covenant with Him”and God will in return “...bring us peace in the place we desire”. The Puritans goal was to become this model city by “...to do justly, to love mercy, to walk humbly with our God...brotherly affection, we must be willing to abridge ourselves of our superfluities for the supply of others’ necessities...make others’ conditions our own, rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together...” and following the articles of their covenant with God.

4. The importance of a literal city and a literal hill is that it is high above other communities, so people physically look up to see it. Winthrop says, “ For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us”. He wants his Puritan community to be viewed highly by other people, almost as if they were heavenly ( as if being on a hill made them closer to the heavens, therefore closer to God). The Puritans’ mission was to reform, what they believed were, ‘superstitious rituals’ in England by becoming an example of the ideal society which was governed by the strict articles of a covenant with God. The vision of a “city upon a hill” helped the Puritans see what their goal was and helped them through the struggle that would lead to the accomplishments of their goals.

5. The phrase “a city upon a hill” is still used by politicians in speaking about America because since its beginning America has been an example for others to follow; a place that is high (metaphorically speaking) above others, so others look up to it. America conceives itself as a “city upon a hill”: an example, a trendsetter, the ideal place. There are pros and cons to the ‘American Identity’. With this attitude, America has achieved very much at such a young age (there are countries that are thousands of years old and yet America, with its 237 years, is a world power) including territorial and economic growth, technology, music, clothing, the spread of the English language and much more. Although very beneficial, this stance has caused trouble in relations with other countries. America’s self-confidence will either cause it good or bad in the future; we have yet to see.

Raeanne Geffert said...

John Winthrop's "Model of Christian Charity" explains much about the beliefs and goals of the Puritans. The most obvious thing it portrays is the Puritan's deep religious roots. God is mentioned throughout the sermon, and the Puritans regard Him as the ultimate reason they have established this colony. Winthrop states, "So that if we shall deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken and so cause Him to withdraw His present help from us, we shall be made a story and byword throughout the world... ". This illustrates the Puritan's motivation to be seen as "good people" in God's eyes. This statement also shows just how totally the Puritans believed their success was linked to God. Another idea Puritans attempted to achieve was that of unity. They believed that this was a religious mission for everyone, and that they would experience each struggle together. Winthrop states, "For this end we must be knit together in this work as one man, we must entertain each other in brotherly affection, we must be willing to abridge ourselves of our superfluities for the supply of others' necessities... " In other words, the needs of the majority outweigh the needs of the few. The Puritans held values that they hoped would bring them closer to God.

The phrase "City upon a Hill" has both metaphorical and literal meanings. It is the idea that the Puritans were so "godly" and pure, that they were superior to everyone else. They were the people to emulate. The image of a city upon a hill drives in the isolation and their arrogant mindset. The literal meaning is a city upon a hill is not easily attacked or easy to get into. It is regarded highly, and is usually a place people want to be. People are able to gaze upon it, but not able to set foot in it. This seclusion is what a literal city on a literal hill would have had. We must also consider that this phrase was first used in the Bible, in Matthew 5:14: "You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden." The religious tie seen here only reaffirms the Puritans faith, and how they are also striving to be the "light of the world".

Raeanne Geffert said...

Hi Ashley,

I completely agree with your statement, "In the title it says "A Model" and that's what this city is, a model for what could evolve into something bigger. The actions, rules, and beliefs could be put into religions or large communities."

This was what the Puritans were looking to accomplish, to become something lasting, and bigger than just them. I pose this question to you: Do you think that our United States is the larger version of this "City Upon a Hill"?

~Raeanne Geffert

Kiersten Sirowich said...

2. John Winthrop "model of christian charity" explain about the belief and goals of Puritans. Puritans are English protestant reformers who sought to purify the church of England from catholic rituals and creeds. In the article it states "We are entered to covenant with Him for this work," this tells us that we have to agree with God and his teachings. This connects to the Puritans because they want to Purify the works of god by getting rid of catholic teaching that are not meant to be there. This agreement wants the Puritans to be in charge of the church in the new world.

4. A city on a hill can mean two things that all sum up to one meaning. When you see a city on a hill you may think that it is a hard climb to get to the point of the city. Or you can think the Start of america. This phrase was used a lot in the starting points of creating america. The Puritans used this phrase the most because they believed it was a religious meaning as well.

Kiersten Sirowich said...

Hi Raeanne,
Your Responses were great! I really liked how you connected with the bible to show what exactly the puritans were thinking.
Do you believe that America was only looking at the puritans? Or do you think that maybe the puritans had some rivals?
Over all your responses were great.
-Kiersten Sirowich

Emily Wrogg said...

The sermon explains the beliefs and goal of the Puritans, which was to please God by doing everything in His honor. Puritans believed that they must be kind and generous people, especially toward their neighbors, because that is what God wished for them. They needed to carry out God's wishes in order to complete their main goal: to please and serve God. The sermon says: "We must be willing to abridge ourselves of our superfluities for the supply of others' necessities; we must uphold a familiar commerce together..." This segment shows that John Winthrop was an avid believer in selflessness and giving charity towards Puritan neighbors as though they were family. This is part of the Puritan work ethic. Winthrop also asked his followers to thank God for what they did possess, as he says, "We have hereupon besought Him of favor and blessing." In addition, Winthrop says, "For this end we must be knit together in this work as one man..." This is a crucial part of Puritan belief and customs. They wanted their congregation to work together and assist one another as a way to keep their community strong and focused on God.

Winthrop wants his audience to feel good about the Puritan religion by further explaining what it stands for, and motivated to make these beliefs their priorities. He gives the sermon a message of brotherhood and loyalty to others, especially when he says, "We must delight in each other, make others' conditions our own, rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together, always having before our eyes our commission and community in the work, our community as members of the same body..." Mentioning the Puritan sense of togethernes and teamwork would make the audience confident that they always have someone to trust and rely on in times of need. This audience could have been for people winthrop wanted to convert to become Puritan for this reason as well.

Jillian, I liked how you included a bit of your own opinion into your response. At the end of your second answer, you mentioned how religious beliefs involved in a government "could potentially cause problems regarding opposing beliefs." I agree that the Puritan's only goal was to please God, so they incorporated ways to do so into every aspect of their new lives in America.

Mr. Pags, I answered part of Blog 5 on Monday, August 12th (the first day it became availible) and it didn't show up. I don't have a problem with redoing it, but just to let you know!

Alyssa Brana said...

John Winthrop's "A Model of Chrisitan Charity" sermon explains about the beliefs and goals of the Puritans because they believed that God had chosen them to become a model for all other Christians. As a Puritan himself, John Winthrop strongly agreed with his fellow Christians. He said, "We are entered into covenant with Him for this work, we have taken out a commission, the Lord hath given us leave to draw our own articles we have professed to enterprise these actions upon these and these ends, we have hereupon besought Him of favor and blessing." The Puritans believed in serving God and God alone. Their goal in life was to please God.

The phrase "city on a hill" is still used by politicians today when speaking about America because they view America as the Puritans viewed themselves. The Puritans thought that they were specifically chosen by God to lead by example for all other Christians. They said," For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us." Therefore, the Puritans thought they were "higher" and the perfect role model for all Christians. The phrase "city on a hill" can be used when discussing America because America is seen as a model country for less developed nations

Anastasija Cupic said...

Ashley,
Just like Raeanne, I agree with you when you say "In the title it says "A Model" and that's what this city is, a model for what could evolve into something bigger. The actions, rules, and beliefs could be put into religions or large communities." So simple, yet so accurate. If we examine the title more, “A model of Christian Charity” could mean “an example of Christian charity”, implying that the settlement was Puritans doing charity for other Christians by giving them an example to follow. Or maybe “Christian Charity” has another meaning? What do you think?
~Anna

Ty Sirowich said...

2.John Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” sermon explains that the beliefs and goals of the Puritans were to love God and do the right thing for God. Winthrop says, "Is to follow the counsel of Micah, to do justly, to love mercy, to walk humbly with our God." This illustrates the Puritans put god before everything and performed to the way he wanted things done. The Puritans also believed to treat each other fairly. They were unselfish people. Winthrop states,"Make others' conditions our own." Puritans wanted t help each other out and to obey God create a successful settlement.

5.The phrase “city on a hill” is still used by politicians today in speaking about America because other countries use America as an example of a successful nation based on our government, history, and community. There is a stable government, an inspiring history to make Americans proud, and a community that grows together. This suggest Americans convey themselves as being a model for other countries to follow and Americans are proud of their history. Also, Americans believe other countries look up to them.

Ty Sirowich said...

Ashley,

I agree with how you said Winthrop wanted to make his audience feel motivated about putting "loyalty, honesty, friendship, and brotherhood above all else." However Winthrop was also motivating the people and persuade them about the Puritan religion and putting God above anyone else.

Alyssa Brana said...

Raeanne:
Your response was very well written. I especially liked how you described both the literal and metaphorical meaning of the phrase "a city upon a hill." Do you still think that the Puritans were trying to seclude themselves form other Christians? Or were they simply trying to be seen as higher than others?

~Alyssa

Coray Marchetti said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Coray Marchetti said...

John Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” sermon explains about the goals and beliefs of the puritans. The beliefs of the puritans is that god wants everyone to work together in unity and peace. This is explained in John's quote,"Thirdly, that every man might have need of other, and from hence they might all be knit more nearly together in the bond of brotherly affection. From hence it appears plainly that no man is made more honorable than another, or more wealthy, etc., out of any particular and singular respect to himself, but for the glory of his creator and the common good of the creature, man." This quote also explains the puritans goals which are to work together in peace for their god.

The phrase “city on a hill” is still used by politicians today because it shows how much power and wealth our country has. The fact that politicians use it still today is great because it shows that our country is still being looked at like a house on a hill. Its shows how much pride our government has for America.

Coray Marchetti said...

Dear Alyssa,

I agree with your comment about the puritan's goal which you said,"Their goal in life was to please God." I think that your statement also shows how much faith the puritans had for their god, what ever they did was for god and not for themselves. Your comment made me think, therefor you did a great job with writing your excerpt.

Sincerely,
Corey

Scott Walkinshaw said...

The beliefs and goals of the puritans that are depicted in the sermon explain how they feel that they are an example for human standard. Being on a theoretical hill would put their behavior on display allowing the rest of the world to see that intolerance can push successful people away, hindering the growth of their own society. Winthrop uses the phrase "by word of mouth" to show how that slowly but surely their success not only their strict society will be known globally.

Winthrop is trying to motivate his audience about how they will be an idol for all other societies. Winthrop believes that the "pressure is on" for them to succeed and for the colony to maintain their beliefs so they can be a true example. He wants the puritans to keep their principles, to prove something, something that cant be attained by everyone, especially in modern society.

Scott Walkinshaw said...

Alyssa,

I really like your response to the first question. it was very thorough and accurate but i have to disagree with you on your final thought in your response. In my opinion I don't think that America is "a city upon a hill" for developing countries. How could America be an idol when it has one of the highest poverty, unemployment, and death rates in developed nations.
Sincerely,
Scott

Ashley Maloney said...

Dear Scott,
I agree with you in the statement you made saying "to prove something." I think that is a very good thought. Winthrop wants to keep a lasting impression.
Do you think the Puritans and Winthrop set a true example for our modern society?

Jenna Stepleman said...


4.) A city on a hill gives the idea of being looked up to because of its superiority. A city on a hill can be see by everyone around so the puritans thought they should model what they believed to be "perfect behavior". It also suggests a protected area because a literal city on a hill would be high enough to avoid any problems that would affect a normal city such as flooding and fire. This hints to me a small amount of arrogance in the text with him believing nothing could harm them Winthrop put this image into his text because he wanted to give a vivid idea of how our everyday lives have been impacted without us even stopping to notice.

5. The phrase “a city upon a hill” is still used by politicians in speaking about America because America still continues to try to show the world the way of a perfect nation( metaphorically speaking). I also firmly believe America may have some of the arrogance the term "city on a hill" implies to me, and that has caused some political unrest with other nations. But aside from politics America ( being as young a nation as it is) has made some amazing strides in music,technology, language, and ideas that will continue to affect other nations whether the political unrest worsens or lessens.

Jenna Stepleman said...

Hi Anna!

--I really love your response about why america is still using the term "city on a hill". It was very insightful and I loved your ideas with "American Identity" but I also think while you said " With this attitude, America has achieved very much at such a young age" I think a lot of America's achievements have had a lot of help from other country's and places. This leads me to question, is america really an ideal place?

liam flannery said...

The fundamental point that John Winthrop seems to be making throughout his excerpt is that brotherhood, charity, kindness, and benevolence is of primary importance when expanding your community through God. Winthrop also states that regardless of your social status each person is to benefit someone of a different status in a positive way. He says,"Thirdly, that every man might have need of other, and from hence they might all be knit more nearly together in the bond of brotherly affection." Meaning when all people serve a vital, and similar purpose in order to thrive in that Puritan community, then they become one through doing the work of God.

The phrase, "City on a Hill" is still used by many politicians, when regarding ourselves as a country because it shows the importance of the struggle to reach a critical time when everything seemed to be working correctly. America was conceived in liberty, and a city upon a hill is a positive metaphor to demonstrate how America should be looked upon as an elite and strong country, just as it was when it first began to unravel in New England.

liam flannery said...

Hi Ashley,
I agree with your statement that in the title it says "A Model" which accurately shows what the puritans were trying to become, and why they wanted to be regarded as a "City on a Hill." It's also a good way to show how the title really insinuates what the whole excerpt will be based upon.

Anastasija Cupic said...

Hi Jenna!
Thank you very much! I agree with your answer to question 5. You gave an unbiased opinion and included different view points. Very well done! :)
In regards to America being the ideal place, for some it is, and for others it is not; everyone's view and experiences are different. This would be a good question to discuss in class, don't you think so?
~Anna

Emily Curina said...

2. John Winthrop’s “A Model of Christian Charity” sermon explains a lot to readers about the beliefs and goals of the Puritans. To start, the Puritans believed that everything they were doing was completely for God, and that the reason of their existence was to serve him. "Thus stands the cause between God and us. We are entered into covenant with Him for this work." This is why their goals were to work together in order to accomplish the bringing up of this city. They thought if they worked peacefully, "we must be knit together in this work as one man, we must entertain each other in brotherly affection", that they would avoid a "shipwreck", and they would be able to "walk humbly" with God.

4. The most lasting image from “A Model of Christian Charity” was the image of a "city on a hill". This is because John Winthrop wanted his city to be viewed as a model city and the Puritans to be viewed as model people. This is why when thinking of a literal city on a literal hill you think of the city being higher than everything and everyone else, almost as if it was on a different level, and as if it was something worthy of being looked up to. Winthrop described this by saying "the eyes of all people are upon us.”

Emily Curina said...

Hi Liam,
I like how you mentioned that many politicians today still use the phrase "a city on a hill" to demonstrate how other people and country's look up to America. It shows that the United States does still aim to be thought of as a strong leader and as a model country.
Sincerely,
Emily

Abby Furfaro said...

John Winthrops "Model of Christian Charity" sermon esentially explains how the Puritan's main beliefs ans goals were to please God and that people were put on this earth soley for that purpose. It states how if you were to fail to please God, that he would "surely break out in wrath against" you. The Puritans were such strong believers in God that this was a significant statement theat posed as a warning not to disobey and dishonor God. "We must be knit together...entertain each other...brotherly affection...abridge ourselves for the supply of others' necessities...rejoice together". These are just few of the tthings made mandatory by the "Counel of Micah" to be followed to "avoid this shipwreck" of being shamed by God. The Puritans would follow these guidelines in hopes to recieve the "favor and blessing" and out of fear of their "prayers to be turned into curses"

A Model Christian Charity could be seen as a sort of peptalk to motivate people to please and obey God. It shows how if you are sucessful in pleasing him, then you would recieve his "favor and blessing...praise and glory...suceeding plantations" This alone is promising and would encourage people of the colony to attampt to "follow the Counsel of Micah". Secondly, the Model of Christian Charity also poses as a threat. It threatens that if you are not to intend as god intended you to, that your "prayers to be turned to curses...pleasures,profits..shall surely perish". saying that if you should disobey the ways you should be living, your life, in lack of a better word, would suck.

Abby Furfaro said...

Alyssa,
I agree with you that the the Puritans believed that they were "choosen" however, i think you should have included an example of one of the punishments they were worried about recieving if they were not to please got to support your answer even more. I also really liked how you said that america views themsellves as the puritans did so long ago. it shows how the values didnt change and we still consider ourselves as rolemodels. Good work!
-Abby

Abby Furfaro said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alexa Fryc said...

John Winthrop's, " A model to Christian Charity" explains that the beliefs and goals of puritans is to do as much as possible to please God. In the passage, it said for them to "follow the counsel of Micah, to do justly, to love mercy, to walk humbly with our God." This basically means to love one another, and to not to anything to make the lord unpleased or else, as it said in the article "the Lord will surely break out in wrath against us".
The points Winthrop uses to make the audience feel good or motivated is by stating the things that will happen if they follow what he says or he won't. By saying things like "Now if the Lord shall please to hear us, and bring us in peace to the place we desire", he's saying that basically if you want your life to be good, then you have to live by God's rules. If not, then you will suffer.

Jesica Litwa said...

John Winthrop's "A model of Christian Charity" explains the beliefs and goals of Puritans because their main goals were to please only God. In the passage it states "we must delight in each other, make others' conditions our own, rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together, always having before our eyes our commission and community in the work, our community as members of the same body So shall we keep the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace." This explains how everything was done "together" as one in order to keep peace and the bond between them. Also, certain guidelines were set to be followed in order to obey God "Lord our God my bless us in the land whither we go to possess it"

A Model Christian Charity is seen as a pep talk based on what God would give in return if people would follow and obey. It states "favor and blessing...praise and glory...succeeding plantations" which explains if those who will please God will receive such loyalty from God. However, it can be seen as a threat also because if people disobey God and do not successfully please God then "prayers to be turned to curses...pleasures,profits..shall surely perish."

Alexa Fryc said...

Jes,
I absolutely love how you used a lot of detail. When I was reading your response, your examples really helped me understand your answer. Keep up the good work!

Jesica Litwa said...

Hi Alexa,
I liked how you described the details of what would happen when people "disobey" God. You gave a thorough answer, although it made me think that if disobeying God was a bad thing what would happen to those that didn't believe?

Julia Pietruszka said...

John Winthrop's "Model of Christian Charity" sermon explains that the beliefs and goals of the Puritans were centered around one major goal of creating a new society in a different environment. Winthrop stated, "Every man might have need of other, and from hence they might all be knit more nearly together in the bond of brotherly affection." In saying this, Winthrop claims that as a society, they will all need each other to cooperate and succeed. Winthrop also includes phrases like "for the preservation and good of the whole" and 'for...the common good of the creature, man." These phrases emphasize the strife towards the overall survival of their society, this "whole" that needs to be preserved. Winthrop's sermon also explains that in order for their common goal of keeping their new society together to become reality, they rely heavily on God's blessings. This is why Winthrop preaches remaining pure in action and lifestyle-he believes it is the only way God will continue to bless the colony. Winthrop said the colony needed to "walk in His ways and to keep His commandments and His ordinance, and His laws, and the articles of our covenant with Him...that the Lord our God may bless us in the land whither we go to possess it." In short, by living life religiously and following God's rules, Winthrop believed the colony would survive.

Literally speaking, the phrase "city on a hill" produces an image of something everyone can see, meaning that it is exposed and if its society fails or makes any sort of error, it will be up for scrutinization by all. Winthrop is turning to that image in this particular context to suggest that his Puritan community has a lot at stake in creating a new society overseas and that if they make any mistake, it will not go unnoticed. Winthrop states, "But if our hearts shall turn away so that we will not obey, but shall be seduced and worship other Gods, our pleasures, and profits, and serve them, it is propounded unto us this day, we shall surely perish out of the good Land whither we pass over this vast Sea to possess it." This is more so a wake-up call than a motivational pep talk to his Puritan community. While Winthrop did mention what they can achieve if they obey God, here he is stating how high the stakes are for them if they don't play their cards right in this new settlement. And Winthrop does have a point- settlements like Jamestown failed and had their horrible mistakes publicized, so he doesn't want the Puritans to make those same mistakes since they will be watched as well.

Pat Tucker said...

This showed that the beliefs of the puritans in god was very strong. They were very religious and wanted to make a better world. This strongly impacted the people around them to follow in the same footstep at them. A better world would create more trade. They also had a strong belief in god that he would help them in times of need to help them to survive better.


THe things that is important about a city on a hill is that there is a better advantage to war. also they are right up ther efor everyone to see. They can see down on the people below. Also they are high up close to the heavens so that could have an impact on their spiritual beliefs.

Pat Tucker said...

hi Jenna I agree how you said that a city on a hill shows "superiority" because it show that they are high and mighty and they were chosen to be the one to be king of a role model.

Bree Schmitt said...

John Winthrop's "A model of Christian Charity" explains all of the beleifs and morals of the Puritans. They show that their goals and morals are done to please God. The way that their laws were created was around their christian beliefs. All & all John Winthrop's "A model of Christian Charity" is all about the goals and morals of the Puritans.

The Phrase, "A city on a hill" to me means that the people in the city were role models, and they believe that their city should be a model as to what everyone else want, they wanted to show that they were living the "Right way" It had to be absolutely perfect because being on a hill, everyone could see it, from every single angle possible.John Winthrop believed that if this city wasn't perfect, God would get mad at them, and take away anything that he has given them.

Bree Schmitt said...

Ashley,
I like how you said that he wanted to make others feel good, and it wasn't all about him. This shows his selfless personality and that he really does try to think of other people too.

Julia Pietruszka said...

Tyler,
Your idea of the Puritans putting "God before everything" is interesting. Can you be sure that this is what they wanted when they hadn't set foot on the new land yet? Since Winthrop was the one who wrote and spoke this sermon, perhaps he was pushing the idea of placing God before all other things, but is there really certainty that this was the Puritans' desire?

Julia Pietruszka said...

Tyler,
Your idea of the Puritans putting "God before everything" is interesting. Can you be sure that this is what they wanted when they hadn't set foot on the new land yet? Since Winthrop was the one who wrote and spoke this sermon, perhaps he was pushing the idea of placing God before all other things, but is there really certainty that this was the Puritans' desire?
~Julia

Olivia Gawlak said...

The point Winthrop wanted to make to his audience was to feel good and put friendship, loyalty, and be honest before anything else. He is saying that later in life you will look up to your accomplishment as other would look up at a city upon a hill. He is also saying that everyone should be treated equal, whether you're rich or poor.

The phrase "city upon a hill" suggests to me that the puritans thought they were role models as well as their city. Since everyone can see all around it, they wanted to make it, and thought it was, perfect.

Olivia Gawlak said...

Hallo Ashley, i also think they made their city a role model

Zachary Wiacek said...

The points that John Winthrop seems to want to make his audience feel good or motivated about are to join and work together towards greatness as brothers and put their faith and loyalty in their all powerful God. Winthrop States, "For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us." Winthrop is telling the people that they will be looked up to for leadership due to their great accomplishments in the new world. The "city upon a hill" serves as a beacon of hope for the leaders and gives their followers guidance since they will look up to it.

The phrase "city upon a hill" is still used by politicians today in speaking about America because it displays leadership and courage. "city upon a hill" demonstrates how our government is courageous enough to keep us safe and well taken care of. We look up to them as our leaders and we remain loyal to their laws just as we continue to follow God's sacred laws. This image suggests that America can be looked up to as a "city upon a hill" since it has aided many nations during times of war and continues to keep peace amongst its people.

Zachary Wiacek said...

Bree,

I agree with you about discussing role models for "city upon a hill"; Curious about how God would destroy everything if the city was not perfect since nothing is still perfect today but the leaders strive to achieve greatness and hopefully create perfection in this nation.

Dan Robinson said...

2.The points that Winthrop seems to want to make his audience feel motivated in his speech is when he speaks of all people as equals for it shows that any man who is loyal to one another is just as great or greater than a man with tremendous wealth. This shows that when a group comes together over a common idea that they will be able to overcome a plethora of problems. This equal treatment and loyalty is stated as,"no man is made more honorable than another, or more wealth..." This supports the beliefs that all men will begin to rise up at this point for they realize that nobody can talk them down any further for they are all equal. Another point that will allow people to begin to become uplifted is when he says, “ We shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us.” This gives many the hopes and belief in the speaker and will begin to understand that they will be able to look up to him with great appreciation in the goals shown as a whole. This common goal is evident in many great nations and shows the strength of many people.

4.I feel the phrase "city on the hill" is used by politicians when speaking about America because we as a strong country are basically a model for other countries to follow because the "city" is the strong land that has been built by many and its placement on the "hill" causes it to be a point in which all will be able to view and strive to reach for. This shows that people of America view their land as a wonderful place to live in and show the nationalism of the land and how strong it is. America, as a young country, has shown its substantially greater amount of power and stands out against the old battling countries that still haven't began to reach their full potential. This city's potential has proved nearly full fledged and once again shows how America views itself as a great land.

Dan Robinson said...

Dear Zach,
I agree with your first answer completely! That point in the speech allows people to recognize the power that the nation could easily gain once combined together. I do have a question, however, do you think that there are more points in the speech that will allow many of all ranks to be risen up with hope as well? I feel that there may be a few points that you could add, but your vocabulary was great and I hope you keep up the good work!
Thanks,
Dan Robinson